New Tecumseth Trans Canada Trail in jeaopardy!

The construction of a 26 km gap in the Trans Canada Trail through New Tecumseth was well underway … until council of the Town of New Tecumseth recently halted further construction, due to opposition from local farmers.

This topic will again be discussed by New Tecumeth council on March 31 at 7 PM in the council chambers. Your support in person, or by writing to the Mayor would be greatly appreciated.

For more information on the project, see http://newtecumseth.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Trail-Summary-2.pdf. This site also includes a real neat video of the proposed trail route.

The following article outlines the arguments of the trail opponents. http://www.madhunt.com/trail-takes-council-hit-20140304.html

And here is a great article in support of closing the gap in the Trans Canada Trail through New Tecumseth.

The council in New Tecumeth now wants to look into using on-road linkages between the 9th and 14th lines of New Tecumseth, rather than using the abandoned railway the Town of New Tecumseth owns, which would be much safer and much more attractive.

To write to Mayor McEachern and members of council:

Town of New Tecumseth, 10 Wellington Street East Alliston, ON  L9R 1A1 By phone: 705-435-3900 or 905-729-0057         Fax: 705-440-1170 By e-mail: mayor@newtecumseth.ca;

Thanks for your support.

Simcoe County Trails

Greenway survey request from Ireland

Greenway design – a survey  (10 min)

Richard Manton
PhD candidate in Civil Engineering at NUI Galway

Dear colleagues,
As part of my PhD research on designing for walking and cycling, I am running a survey on the design of greenways. The survey asks user preferences on greenway design and on factors such as environmental impact. The link to the survey is: www.surveymonkey.com/s/greenwaydesign
If you have any queries about the survey or this research, please do not hesitate to contact me at: r.manton1@nuigalway.ie
Many thanks, Richard

 

Greenway Surveysurveymonkey.com

New invasive species… potentially on trails

Himalayan Balsam Impatiens glandulifera

Himalayan balsam is an annual herb, native to the western Himalayas. In the early 1800s it was introduced to many parts of Europe, New Zealand and North America as a garden ornamental. Himalayan Balsam has an orchid shaped flower resembling a British policeman’s helmet, which gave rise to its other common name of “Policeman’s helmet”.

Himalayan balsam can completely cover an area and crowd out native vegetation. Mature seed capsules explode when touched and can eject seeds as much as 5 m from the parent plant, giving it the alternate common name of “Touch-Me-Not plant”. It is mostly found in riparian areas, especially river edges and wetlands.

For more information, go to http://www.invadingspecies.com/invaders/plants-terrestrial/himalayan-balsam/